Special Type of Weaves | Texhour

Chambray, Dobby, Jacquard etc.. are the special types of weaves. Here we may explain one by one for more knowledge.

Special Type of Weaves | Texhour
Special Type of Weaves

 

Special Type of Weaves

Chambray

It is finely woven cotton, made by weaving white or unbleached threads across a colored warp. Usually calendered to give a glossy appearance.

 

End-on-end (fil-à-fil):

It is a type of closely woven, plain weave cloth created by the alternation of light and dark warp and weft threads, resulting in a heather effect. The English term comes from the French "fil-à-fil", literally "thread-to-thread".

Commonly woven from cotton or linen yarn, using a white thread with another color to create a fabric with a subtly heathered texture that appears as a solid color. End-on-end is similar to chambray

 

Dobby:

Small, geometric designs composed of short floats; decorative designs with a textured surface, generally good strength.

 

Jacquard:

Each warp is individually controlled with each pick package and any combination of weaves and patterns is possible, multicolor effects, durability, and strength dependent on weave and yarn.

 

Flannel:

It is very soft cotton (or wool) using low twist yarn and loosely woven in a plain weave or a twill weave. Usually has a nap (i.e. brushing) on one or both sides to provide extra softness and warmth. Typical uses are skirts, night gowns, bathrobes, and skirts. When used for baby or children wear, it must be tested for flammability.

 

Challie (or Challis):

It is a lightweight soft plain-weave fabric of wool, cotton or rayon, usually printed on both sides with small motifs.

 

Cambric:

It is tightly woven cotton, usually in solid colors, such as cambric blue. Used in apparel, especially casual shirts.

 

Poplin:

It is a plain weave, medium weight fabric, usually of 100% cotton, with a thicker yarn for the weft giving an appearance of a very fine rib running from selvedge to selvedge. It is durable, with average drapability and poor crease resistance. Suitable for shirts and blouses.

 

Canvas: 

It is heavyweight cotton, used for items that require strength, such as tote bags, knapsacks, and slipcovers.

 

Chino:

It is a cotton twill that has been pre-shrunk and mercerized. Most often used for sports pants and other sportswear.

 

Seersucker:

It is thin, puckered, all-cotton fabric, usually striped or checked, used for summer tops. The puckering is introduced during weaving by keeping sections of loose warp yarns alternating with sections of tight yarns.

 

Chiffon:

It is a lightweight, balanced plain-woven sheer fabric woven of alternate S- and Z-twist crepe (high-twist) yarns. The twist in the crepe yarns puckers the fabric slightly in both directions after weaving, giving it some stretch and a slightly rough feel. It is made from cotton, silk or synthetic fibers. Chiffon is smoother and more lustrous than the similar fabric georgette.

 

Georgette:

It is like chiffon, this too is a sheer, lightweight, crêpe fabric woven from alternating S- and Z-twist yarns in both warp and weft. The yarns are of a higher twist than chiffon, and are dull-finished, making it is springier with its characteristic crinkled surface, and less lustrous.

 

Corduroy:

It is a ribbed pile fabric with a high lustre and soft feel. Thick and durable – used for jackets, trousers, and upholstery.

 

Khaki:

It is a strong cotton drill weave - used in uniforms and other items that require strength.

 

Lawn:

It is cotton lawn is a fine, crisp, combed cotton fabric, used in children's wear, nightwear, and traditional quilting.

 

Voile:

It is crisp, sheer, lightweight, plain weave cotton, made from single ply high twist yarn, used for gathered skirts and as a lining fabric.